Questions To Patricia Lungu, Human Resource Analyst.

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Patricia LunguWho are more difficult to handle men or women?

Generally women because they are home makers and they have more to do around the house unlike the men, however, with HR and I find this very pleasant, one is able to apply the processes and procedures uniformly across the board.

Mind you HR does becomes unpleasant when you cannot help someone who has genuinely given a reason for either requesting for something or not doing something but, because of what the company Policy states you cannot help.

What is the most common absentee excuse?

Sickness – it be self or any member of the close family. A most outrageous absentee excuse has to be the illness of a pet; dog.

The least acceptable is,

“My car could not start.”

Do you play golf? (Since we hear that a lot of decisions are made there or is that a myth?)

No I do not play golf!  Networking is done there not decision making.

What Do You Do For Leisure?

In my leisure time as I am an advocate of work/life balance; I enjoy globe-trotting with my hubby and our 2 children. I go to the gym, I enjoy cooking and to enhance that I have joined the Kupikilila Recipe Exchange Club.

The Lungu Family

 

I am in the Married Enrichment Fellowship for Ladies – to be of assistance to ladies who are going through challenges in their marriages (having been married for 20 yrs. myself) and I am a member of Alchemy.

I like to attend professional talks whenever possible and I love to read.

If you had a chance to invite someone you admire to a meal at your house who would you invite?

It would be Mother Teresa or Nelson Mandela.

Mother Teresa; for her simplicity and for her leadership and I would want to know what really led her to a life of poverty. And to ask her who was her inspiration and why?

Nelson Mandela reason being, he managed to forgive his oppressors even after 27 years of incarceration. The discussion around the table would firstly be clearing the air on his purported non belief in God.  Secondly what insight he had to forgive people that had tortured him for 27 years and then move on. Who inspired him and why? What leadership quality he considers most important for a leader and why?

I would put beef on their dinner menu (since I love beef) so I would cook and serve oxtail stew, beans, cabbage and nshima.

What would you tell the young girl at Secondary School today?

There are so many things that one would want to say to the young girl in secondary school but up most would be-study hard so that you can go to Uni or College! Fundamentally the reason to talk to the young girl would be to find out what they want to become in the future.  That answer would be the basis of the talk. It would shock some that the young girl’s ambition does not require them to go to a University!!

 

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About Balekile Gausi

A prolific Zambian writer covering work, money and lifestyle that passed through university and came away with a very good grasp of public administration, finance management, money and banking and international relations. A civil servant that quickly opted for self-employment and training as a Journalist and Writer Balekile has been a freelance feature writer for several decades and has also published fiction in Drum and The BBC Focus on Africa Magazine. Settled and living in Lusaka after many years of living in several cities in Africa and Europe; Balekile is also an avid bird watcher, is married with 3 adult children and has an extraordinary fondness for chikanda ( the local delicatessen that vegans and non-vegans world-wide are putting on their bucket list!)

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